Archive for January, 2013

Build Company Loyalty with your employees

 

Unlike the job market even twenty years ago, it is now perfectly normal for a worker to go through three or five jobs within ten years.  The days of staying with a job for most of your life are no longer with us, and this means that businesses have to work harder to keep the talent that they want.

 

But how do you build loyalty?  One of the ways is through making sure that employees feel fulfilled at their jobs, and often times employees who feel fulfilled do positive things for a company- such as going out of their way to boost morale and solve conflicts.

 

Other ways that you can build employee loyalty and relationships is through spending more time in the initial training process of employees.  Introducing candidates to several people on your team will help make sure that you’re picking someone who will fit in with your current corporate culture, and help them better integrate with the culture when they are hired.

 

Watch your managers too.  Studies show that managers are the most important source of growth and inspiration.  Making sure your managers are trained to inspire their employees and offer opportunities for growth is one of the biggest way to keep your employees happy at their jobs.

 

And when it comes to management, nearly everyone wants to move up and be promoted, but not everyone wants to manage other people.  Giving employees the option to choose management or perhaps a different type of promotion, like a technical one, is more likely to keep them at your company.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to maintain grace under pressure

It is pretty obvious these days that stress, especially constant stress, can put your health at significant risk.  According to the Mayo Clinic, stress works on the same circuit as most perceived threats, increasing adrenaline to increase your heart rate, and blood pressure, and cortisol floods your body to increase the glucose in your body and curb functions that would be unnecessary in a fight or flight situation, such as immune system, digestive system, reproductive system, and growth processes. 

 

But when you are stressed almost constantly, these natural reactions to stress can be incredibly hurtful.  The list of health problems starts at difficulty sleeping and works it way up to obesity then up to memory impairment and heart disease.  

 

So as we head back to work, and back to stress, what can we do to maintain a sense of grace under pressure? 

 

First of all, know your limits.  Don’t take on more at work than you can reasonably handle, as in the long run taking on more than you can do can be dangerous to your health.  And, when you can, work to manage your time more effectively.  If you don’t manage your time then someone else will do it for you, and that leads to stress.

 

And when you do get angry, work to channel that anger in an effective way.  Figure out exactly who you are upset with, and why, and then figure out what you can do to fix the situation.  Don’t just sit back and simmer, work to make your situation better.  Not only will this help improve your life, but it will also give you the sense that you are in charge of your own destiny. 

How to celebrate success

The end of the year is a traditionally a time of celebration, but what businesses forget as the year winds down is to take time to do more than celebrate the season.  Good leaders know that one of the most useful things a leader can do towards the end of the year is to celebrate success.

 

 

 

Why? It is much too easy for employees to head home for the holidays looking only at their failures.  It is easy to see where you have failed, it is a great deal harder to figure out where you have succeeded.  And an employee who feels as if they have nothing to offer to a company rarely does.

 

 

 

So it falls to the leaders of a company to spend some time looking through the year and recognizing success where they find it.  Look at each month and chart your success as a company, and figure out who you can attribute that success to.  What products did you launch?  What projects did you finish?  What problems did you solve?

 

 

 

Doing this as a management staff will also help you to determine who your most valuable players are, and who might need a little additional help in the upcoming year- both excellent year-end conversations to have.

 

 

 

And once you have your list, figure out some way to share this with your staff.  Maybe you can throw a dinner party where you toast everyone’s success, or perhaps you can send a gift basket with a card detailing their biggest wins over the year.  However you decide, make sure that you share each person’s success with them so that your employees can come back after the first to start the new year off running!

 

 

 

 

The 10 Least Satisfying Jobs

We all want to be satisfied with the work we do, but not everyone is so lucky. Here’s a question to consider before you decide what career path you’re going to follow: how satisfying will your future job be? MyPlan.com has released a 2012 report of jobs that surveyed nearly 14,000 users. Compiled within the report are lists for the most and least satisfying, highest and lowest paying, and most popular jobs by employment size.

So, ready to embark on that new career but want to ensure you don’t end up somewhere that’s unsatisfactory? These ten jobs were rated as the least satisfying by employees, so be sure to steer clear of them unless you’re sure it’s right for you:

1. Mail Clerks & Mail Machine Operators (except postal service)—Satisfaction rate: 25.0%

2. Program Directors—Satisfaction rate: 30.0%

3. Municipal Clerks—Satisfaction rate: 30.0%

4. Food Preparation & Serving Workers, Other—Satisfaction rate: 31.6%

5. Maids & Housekeeping Cleaners—Satisfaction rate: 31.7%

6. Insurance Policy Processing Clerks—Satisfaction rate: 33.3%

7. Hotel, Motel & Resort Desk Clerks—Satisfaction rate: 34.4%

8. Food Preparation & Serving Workers (including fast food) —Satisfaction rate: 34.4%

9. Telemarketers—Satisfaction rate: 34.4%

10. Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors—Satisfaction rate: 35.0%

Food Preparation & Serving Workers is also the fourth largest career by employment size, unfortunately, which means lots of unhappy workers. It also lands on the lowest paying job list. Obviously, it’s not just the money that makes workers feel dissatisfied with their jobs.